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CBD Oil Utah 2020: Is CBD Oil Legal In Utah & Where To Buy?

CBD or cannabidiol is a remarkable compound that became internationally famous for its amazing benefits when children with Dravet syndrome, a rare type of childhood epilepsy, experienced profound benefits from CBD.

Over the years, researchers have found that cannabinoids can be useful for treatment for other forms of epilepsy, anxiety, and depression, insomnia, and other sleep disorders, chronic pain caused by inflammation, and a host of other medical conditions.

However, even with the knowledge of how beneficial CBD is, there are laws pertaining to marijuana-derived products that make them wonder if it is safe for them to purchase these products in the first place. In this case, you’re living in Utah, in need of CBD oil either for wellness or health reasons, but you aren’t sure whether CBD oil is legal in Utah?

Is CBD Oil Legal in Utah?

While CBD has been readily accepted in most states, it is essential to understand that the recreational use of marijuana remains illegal. If you are found in possession of even the smallest amount of cannabis, you will face criminal penalties.

Luckily, on November 6, 2018, Utah, voters expanded access to medical marijuana. This means that patients with qualifying conditions designated by Proposition 2 can access medical cannabis. These conditions include:

  • Epilepsy or debilitating seizures
  • Cancer
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Crohn’s disease/Ulcerative colitis
  • Autism
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Persistent nausea that’s not responsive to traditional treatment. This is exclusive of cannabis-induced syndromes or pregnancy-related nausea
  • Terminal illness that reduces a patient’s life’s expectancy to less than six months or medical conditions that need hospice care
  • Pain lasting more than two weeks that’s not managed adequately and persists despite treatment with conventional medications other than opiates or opioids, or physical interventions.
  • A rare disease or condition affecting less than 200,00 people in the United States that’s not adequately managed despite using conventional medications to treat it.
  • Conditions approved on a case-by-case basis by the Compassionate Use Board.

Proposition 2 also allowed the creation of state-licensed facilities to grow, test, process, or sell cannabis for medicinal purposes. It regulates these facilities by employing electronic systems to track cannabis purchases and inventory, which limits certain product types and imposes limits and requirements on advertisements and packages.

A compromise cannabis law was crafted, regardless of whether Proposition 2 passed. The bill called for medical cannabis card renewal requirements to be relaxed, employment protection for patients to be offered, qualifications for guardians and caregivers to be tightened, and the consumption of marijuana to be regulated.

On December 2, 2018, the compromise bill was passed and signed by Republican Governor Gary Herbert. Before that, Herbert had also signed HB 105 in 2014 to amend Utah’s code concerning hemp. The bill allowed the UDAF (Utah Department of Agriculture and Food) to grow industrial hemp for academic research and agriculture purposes.

It also legalized consumption and possession of low-THC CBD for patients with intractable epilepsy. In 2018, another bill, HB 195, was signed into law to grant patients with terminal illnesses to try medical marijuana. In the same year, another companion bill, HB 197, was signed to give the State of Utah a monopoly on cultivating marijuana, processing, and selling medical cannabis.

However, Republican Senate Majority Leader Evan Vickers modified the medical marijuana distribution plan via 12 privately run dispensaries in 2019. This was after county-level attorneys advised the legislature that public employees who worked in state-run dispensaries were being put at risk of federal prosecution.

Hence, under the current Utah marijuana laws, The UDOH (Utah Department of Health) is in charge of registering doctors recommending marijuana, issuing patients with medical marijuana cards, and licensing dispensaries that sell marijuana.

One must, therefore, have a medical marijuana card before purchasing medical cannabis in the state-licensed private medical marijuana pharmacies. Patients younger than 21 must have their cards approved by Utah’s Compassionate Use Board.

Why You Should Buy CBD Oil Utah Online?

Considering the gray lines regarding the legality of CBD in Utah, it is safer to purchase CBD oil online. The perks of buying CBD online are plenty. As opposed to buying CBD oil at a store near you, buying online is convenient, easy, and fast. It will take you about 5-10 minutes to place your order.

The price deals are also better online. In most stores, the prices are fixed. However, because completion in the CBD industry is increasing rapidly, brands that sell their products online want to make their prices as friendly as possible in order to keep their customers.

Online purchase also allows you to make sure you can trust the company by doing a proper background check on them. You will be able to make sure that the manufacturer uses 100% organic hemp from their third-party lab testing results and make sure they use environment-friendly methods to manufacture the oil.

Looking to buy CBD Oil Utah state 2020 but you have no idea how to go about it without getting in trouble with law enforcement?