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Cannabis in the arm: what can we learn from intravenous cannabinoid studies?

Affiliation

  • 1 King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF. [email protected]
  • PMID: 22716141
  • DOI: 10.2174/138161212802884618

Cannabis in the arm: what can we learn from intravenous cannabinoid studies?

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Authors

Affiliation

  • 1 King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF. [email protected]
  • PMID: 22716141
  • DOI: 10.2174/138161212802884618

Abstract

Cannabis is widely used recreationally and for symptomatic relief in a number of ailments. However, cannabis has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of psychotic illness. For forty years researchers have utilised intravenous preparations of Δ(9)-THC, as well as several other phytocannabinoids, in a laboratory setting. The intravenous route has the most reliable pharmacokinetics, reducing inter-individual variation in bioavailability and is well suited for the delivery of synthetic compounds containing a sole pharmacological moiety. Given the association between cannabinoids and psychotic illness, there has been a resurgence of interest in experimental studies of cannabinoids in humans, and the intravenous route has been employed. Here in a critical review, we appraise the major findings from recent intravenous cannabinoid studies in humans and trace the historical roots of this work back to the 1970’s.

Cannabis is widely used recreationally and for symptomatic relief in a number of ailments. However, cannabis has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of psychotic illness. For forty years researchers have utilised intravenous preparations of Δ(9)-THC, as well as several other phytoca … ]]>